5 Best Woodworking Hammers of 2019 – Reviews & Buying Guide

Of all wood woodworking tools, hammers are possibly the oldest invention. They are also timeless; no matter what new tools we come up with, nothing can replace the hammer. 

Hammers work as an extension of your arm, and thus it’s vital to work with a piece that feels safe, comfortable, and efficient. This review takes a look at the 5 best woodworking hammers in the market.

Best Value
Stanley 51-167 22-Ounce FatMax Xtreme AntiVibe Rip Claw Framing Hammer
HART 21 Oz Milled Face Fiberglass Framing Hammer
Estwing Sure Strike California Framing Hammer - 25 oz Straight Rip Claw with Milled Face & Hickory Wood Handle - MRW25LM
Dalluge DDT16P 16 Ounce DDTP Titanium Hammer
Best Overall
HART 21 oz Steel Curved Handle Mill
Stanley 51-167 22-Ounce FatMax Xtreme AntiVibe Rip Claw Framing Hammer
HART 21 Oz Milled Face Fiberglass Framing Hammer
Estwing Sure Strike California Framing Hammer - 25 oz Straight Rip Claw with Milled Face & Hickory Wood Handle - MRW25LM
Dalluge DDT16P 16 Ounce DDTP Titanium Hammer
HART 21 oz Steel Curved Handle Mill
Best Value
Stanley 51-167 22-Ounce FatMax Xtreme AntiVibe Rip Claw Framing Hammer
Stanley 51-167 22-Ounce FatMax Xtreme AntiVibe Rip Claw Framing Hammer
HART 21 Oz Milled Face Fiberglass Framing Hammer
HART 21 Oz Milled Face Fiberglass Framing Hammer
Estwing Sure Strike California Framing Hammer - 25 oz Straight Rip Claw with Milled Face & Hickory Wood Handle - MRW25LM
Estwing Sure Strike California Framing Hammer - 25 oz Straight Rip Claw with Milled Face & Hickory Wood Handle - MRW25LM
Dalluge DDT16P 16 Ounce DDTP Titanium Hammer
Dalluge DDT16P 16 Ounce DDTP Titanium Hammer
Best Overall
HART 21 oz Steel Curved Handle Mill
HART 21 oz Steel Curved Handle Mill

Last update on 2019-11-16 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

How to Buy the Right Woodworking Hammer 

Your choice of a hammer can directly impact your efficiency and productivity. In my many years of construction, I have interacted with many hammers. 

The thing is that everyone can have their opinion about the best hammers, but there are definitive qualities that are always consistent in any chef-d’oeuvre hammer. Here are some of the critical things to consider:

Wooden handles might be sound shock absorbers 

If your preferred woodworking hammer doesn’t come with anti-vibration features, it would be wise to opt for a wooden hammer handle. Wooden handles can help to dampen the vibrations with every blow. 

The downside, however, is durability. Wooden handles are prone to snapping. However, hickory and other hardwood handles might last a little longer. 

Steel handles are a sign of durability 

If you want a hammer that lasts you a lifetime, you will probably have to choose a steel frame handle. In that case, though you will need to consider models with anti-shock features. That includes rubber grips that help with ease of use. 

Fiberglass handles perform averagely 

Hammers with fiberglass handles last a little more than wood, but they are not as robust as steel. The vibration of fiberglass hammers also falls in the middle between steel and wooden handle hammers. 

Fiberglass hammers might, therefore, be an acceptable compromise if you need a little bit of both durability and shock absorption. 

Size and length of the handle

The other thing to consider when buying a woodworking handle is the length of the handle. You can opt for a thirteen-inch frame or go for a seventeen or eighteen-inch handle.  Longer handles require some getting used to, but they deliver a maximum amount of nailing power. 

A light hammerhead is easier to work with 

Find a hammer that you can comfortably swing all day without crippling arm fatigue. Heavy hammers can slow you down. 

Be that is may remember that you need your hammers to be a little heavier so you can drive the nails flush without much of a struggle. The recommendable hammer head weight is about 20 ounces.  

Working with gigantic hammerheads (above 28 ounces) is not only tiring but can also result in health complications in the long run. You risk developing shoulder problems or tennis elbow. It would be prudent to steer away from such hammers.

Milled face and magnetic nail holder 

Most woodworking hammers have a milled or waffle face. This design helps carpenters to achieve accurate hits without the risk of the nails slipping during the action. Another equally important feature to consider in a woodworking hammer is the magnetic nail holder.

 The latter helps to hold the nails in place so you can deliver an accurate first blow. 

Best Woodworking Hammers in the Market 

1. Stanley 51-167 Xtreme Framing Hammer

  • Stanley Fatmax Xtreme Antivibe Checkered Framing Hammer Rc, 22 Oz
  • Staples!!!!
  • High Quality New!!!!!!!
  • Patented torsion control grip technology reduces the effects of torque on wrists and elbows
  • Patented torsion control grip technology reduces the effects of torque on wrists and elbows

Last update on 2019-11-16 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

The main highlight of the Stanley 51-167 Xtreme Framing Hammer includes a checkered frame and a sizeable hammerhead. Durability and efficiency might, therefore, be on the cards with this hammer.

The hammer has an appealing design that includes a torsion grip technology for the handle. This design could ensure a comfortable and firm hold of the hammer during use.

The anti-vibe handle reduces the amount of vibration transferred to your hands. You might, therefore, be able to work with the Stanley hammer for long with little cases of discomfort.

The head weight qualifies the Stanley hammer for both domestic and heavy-duty applications. The cherry on top is a rip claw that looks herculean enough to rip tough nails out of wood. 

One other thing you might find irresistible here is the magnetic nail start feature. It could help to keep nails in place so you can hammer them straight in. 

There is, therefore, the possibility that you can use this hammer one-handedly, and reduce the risk of accidentally smashing your pinky. 

The manufacturer assures us that the hammerhead is made of rust-free steel that is also corrosion-resistant. That could be welcome news, mainly because it is a sign of strength and longevity. 

It could be a good thing that this hammer feels heavy—weighs almost two pounds. That makes it ideal for heavy use. Nonetheless, I have observed that the weight might not balance well with the length of its frame. 

Stanley 51-167 Xtreme Framing Hammer Pros & Cons

Pros

  • Ideal for light and heavy-duty work
  • AntiVibe checkered handle enables comfortable and safe working
  • Feels durable and sturdy
  • Magnetic nail holder

Cons

  • The head might be too large for some projects

2. Hart 21 oz Milled Face Hickory Framing Hammer

Last update on 2019-11-15 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

This hammer features a milled face and a hickory handle. Hickory wooden handles generally last a tad longer than other wood types. Although they eventually break, replacing them is easy.

The hammerhead weighs 21 oz and coupled with the curved wooden handle you might be able to get well-balanced swings with this tool.

The other advantage here is that wood is a vibration dampener, so probably you won’t have to deal with too much torque on your arms.

The nail pull is uniquely designed for maximum pulling leverage. The hammer lays fat on the surface in the process and thus could perform much better than other models that have top-oriented nail pullers.

The hammerhead is urethane dipped and could, therefore, stay rust-proof for long. 

Like the previously reviewed hammers, this Hart hammer also comes with a magnetic nail holder. It holds the nails in place so you can deliver accurate blows.  

The magnetic nail holder sets the nails a little deeper into the head just to ensure that they don’t wobble when you strike. 

One other unique thing this Hart hammer has going for it is the side strike area that might be useful when nailing in a small space area. You can hit the nail sideways between narrow studs and still be able to achieve accuracy and precision.

Hart 21 oz Milled Face Hickory Framing Hammer Pros & Cons

Pros

  • 180 degrees nail puller
  • Side strike plate
  • Study steelhead
  • The hickory handle can be durable
  • It feels well balanced

Cons

  • The large head might deliver nail bending blows

3. Estwing MRW25LM Framing Hammer

  • Estwing's Sure Strike Wood Handle Framing Hammers have forged solid steel heads
  • With genuine top grade hickory handle
  • Triple Wedge Construction With magnet; Milled face
  • Head weight: 25 oz./ 708 g & Overall Length: 18 Inch / 457 mm
  • Made in Taiwan

Last update on 2019-11-15 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Between a hickory handle and a steel hammerhead, you have a hammer that might serve you for long.

It feels a tad lighter than the previously discussed item, weighing no more than 1.5 pounds. This weight and the sturdy hickory frame possibly results in a well-balanced hammer.

The frame measures 18 inches and features a design that inclines sleekly with the handle. This design could be hugely beneficial to the performance of this product.

The Estwing MRW25LM Framing Hammer also features a magnetic starter that could make your work easier as described earlier. 

The steelhead has a milled face that makes it easier to hit nails head-on without the hammer slipping during your blow.

Hickory wood is the material used for the handle. Hickory is a hardwood type that endures well under pressure while being lightweight at the same time. 

The Estwing hammer also features a slightly wedged rip claw that could be handy when pulling or straightening nails in the process.

Despite its colourful resume, you might have to deal with occasional nail bending with this hammer. Unlike Stanley 51-167, the hammerhead is lightly larger.

Estwing MRW25LM Framing Hammer Pros & Cons

Pros

  • It feels well balanced
  • Satisfactory performance
  • Hickory wood and steelhead means durability and strength
  • Smooth and rustic handle

Cons

  • Larger head

4. Dalluge DDT16P Framing Hammer

  • 16 oz. Titanium Hammer with Smooth Face
  • Patented Shock Absorbing Design
  • Nailoc Magnetic Nail Holder capable of holding both Standard and Duplex Nails
  • Unique Overstrike Guard for Increased Handle Protection
  • Side Nail Puller for Extra Leverage. Reinforced Claws for Added Strength.

Last update on 2019-11-15 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Like the Estwing MRW25LM hammer, this model also uses a hickory handle that has the potential for extended durability. When it comes to the hammerhead material, the manufacturers have gone with titanium.  

The hammerhead is light, weighing just 16 oz, and that makes it ideal/limits it to light-duty operations. 

The 17.3 inches handle balances relatively well with the weight of the hammerhead. That possibly means that you will get an efficient nail driving action without exerting too much stress on your arm. 

Titanium is almost as strong as steel. It’s also a good thing that this material is not susceptible to rust and corrosion. 

The face has a nail puller with a reinforced claw, a design that adds to the hammer’s strength and versatility. 

Dalluge DDT16P Framing Hammer has a magnetic nail holder just like the other previously reviewed hammers. This feature can hold both standard and duplex nails to help you achieve dead-on accuracy. 

The hickory handle supposedly features a proprietary shock-absorbing design that might save your arms from the torque and vibrations that result with every hammer hit.

The worrisome concern with wooden handles is that they tend to break at the neck after some time. The good news is that you can always replace the handles cheaply.

However, when it comes to the Dalluge DDT16P, its weight might not be ideal for driving nails flush. Lighter hammers generally have low striking power. 

Dalluge DDT16P Framing Hammer Pros & Cons

Pros

  • It is lightweight and sturdy
  • Ergonomic design helps to reduce arm fatigue
  • It is well balanced
  • Replaceable handle

Cons

  • Wooden handles eventually break
  • The lightweight nature of the hammer compromises its power

5. Hart 21 oz Milled Face Steel Framing Hammer

Last update on 2019-11-15 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

This Hart hammer has a milled steel face along with a pure steel frame. Where other hammers bow out prematurely due to weak handles, this hart hammer might prove useful for long.

The side nail puller offsets away from the head, resulting in a powerful pulling power. This hammer sits flat on its side for more leverage when pulling the nail. Its efficiency, therefore, exceeds the 90 degrees maximum pull you get with other hammers in the market.

The claw is designed for extra nail pulling clearance, buts it is slightly thicker than what you get with the Dalluge DDT16P Framing Hammer. The hammerhead is also somewhat narrower than most hammers reviewed earlier.

One likable factor is that this hammerhead is urethane dipped to make the steel resistant to rust. You might be able to use this hammer for long, but unavoidably the coating will scratch off, and rust may slowly creep in. 

Sitting atop the striking head is a magnetic nail holder that might help you achieve nailing accuracy. It’s designed to set the nails in the head a little deeper, and that will likely work in your favor, preventing them from sliding when you deliver a blow. 

The steel frame Hart 21 oz Hammers work smoothly, and you might not have to deal with a frustrating amount of vibration. Wood is a natural shock dampener.

The hammer feels well balanced and might be therefore up to snuff even with tasks that involve hardwoods or pressure-treated woods. The smooth correlation between the steelhead and the handle might enable you to drive nails much faster and effortlessly.

Hart 21 oz Milled Face Steel Framing Hammer Pros & Cons

Pros

  • It feels light and sturdy
  • All-Steel construction means longevity
  • It is urethane dipped for protection from rust
  • It’s well balanced

Cons

  • The nail puller needs a full clearance to work
  • No protection from vibrations

The Best Hammer

The Hart 21 oz Milled Face Steel Framing Hammer stands out as the top choice. The hammer features a steelhead, and hickory handles both of which sync well to deliver well-balanced blows.

Steel performs better than titanium when it comes to durability. In this case, the steel is urethane dipped to make this hammer rust and corrosion-proof. 

Hickory handle is made from hardwood and is not only durable, but it also easy to replace when it breaks.

The main triumph this hammer has over many of the reviewed models is its 180 degrees flat nail pull that could enable you to yank out nails with just one swing.

The hammerhead weighs 21 oz and coupled with the curved wooden handle, you might be able to get efficient performance with this tool. 

Another endearing feature is the magnetic nail holder that sets the nails a little deeper into the head for accurate strikes. These features and more set the Hart 21 oz Milled Face Hickory Hammer above many others in the market. 

 

 

Last Updated on

Tom Bradly
 

My entrepreneurial journey started in 2006, when I dropped out of university. I wanted to work with my hands, to build things. Now I mix my background with computers with my first-hand experience with woodworking to provide insights into the tools I like best. I love everything about woodworking and have been building stuff for over 20 years of my life. I hope to pass some knowledge and expertise.